Roses

Roses

Welcome to the Rose Gallery.  All of the rose shots here are of the actual roses growing in my garden.  They’re all mine.  I’ll add photos on a regular basis (especially during the spring, summer, and fall), so make sure to check back in from time to time.  For great info and pics on prepping your roses for winter, be sure to click here to read my really helpful article.  For great pruning, deadheading, and general rose care info throughout the growing season (plus lots more pics), please click here to read my article from the summer of 2022.  And for a foolproof methodology for successfully getting bare root roses in the ground, please have a read of “Planting Bare Root Roses,” from April 2024, here in The RGG.  In the meantime, enjoy the Rose Gallery!  Cheers, and Happy Gardening!

Roses
My 'Rainbow's End' miniature rose has some buds set on 05-04-24.
Roses
A no-name miniature from a big box store on 05-04-24 rejuvenated and growing beautifully after a hard prune in late March. This little bush blooms with gorgeous yellow flowers.
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This no-name miniature, also from a big box store, is something of a celebrity here in RGG Land: It's the very first plant ever purchased by Dee Dee and me for our garden. Here, it's cranking out stems and leafing out like crazy after its hard pruning in late March. This little bush grows nearly 3' high by 3' wide, and is covered in white-peach colored, old-fashioned blooms that are nearly 3" across. I adore this beautiful little rose bush.
Roses
This bush is the opposite of a no-name. It's a David Austin English shrub rose called 'Tranquillity' and it's leafing out beautifully here on 05-04-24. It grows to about 4' high by 4' wide and will be covered in massive white, old-fashioned blooms all summer long. I'm not big on using fancy names for my roses, so I usually just call this guy "the big white one."
Roses
Here's another big name from David Austin Roses, photographed on 05-04-24. This is the English climbing rose 'Bathsheba' and it's new this year for The RGG garden. It also marks a couple more firsts for me: I've never grown a climbing rose before (although my folks grew some real beauties over the years), and I've never grown a rose in a container before. This guy's growing in a gigantic pot, and it will be climbing up a huge trellis engineered, built, and installed by yours truly (you'll see the finished project shortly, and you'll subsequently read about it and see a vid, too). In the meantime, this little own root, bare root rose is growing quickly, will reach a height of 10', and will be covered in massive, apricot-colored, many-petaled blooms. I can't wait to see this rose in action. I'm already calling this guy Big Bill, after my grandfather.
Roses
In this image, and the next one, shots of a few of my roses in hard-pruned and fully fed form on 03-31-24. I hard prune during the second half of March (I'm in hardiness zone 5B/6A), and generally do a first feeding for my roses within the first few days of April. Forecasted bad weather dictated a March 31st first feeding for 2024. It's all good - these guys are all going to have a great year.
Unbelievable Speed 2023
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11-22-23.
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11-17-23.
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11-11-23.
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11-10-123.
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11-04-23.
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11-03-23.
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10-17-23.
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10-14-23.
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10-12-23.
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10-07-23.
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09-30-23.
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This image (of my 'Blue Girl' hybrid tea rose with a bloom set six feet off the ground), and the next, are dated 09-29-23.

Espoma Organic Rose-tone.  Roses are seriously heavy feeders.  You’ve got to fertilize them.  Regularly.  I use Espoma Organic Rose-tone.  It’s an organic granular with an N-P-K ratio of 4-3-2, and it contains a substantial number of various beneficial active microbe cultures.  This is the best rose food I’ve ever used.  Period.  Espoma recommends a monthly application, so I start the first feeding for my roses at the beginning of April and feed them for the last time no later than the first day or two of September.  Click the #advertisement link to learn more, or to order this excellent product right here, directly from Amazon.

Espoma Organic Rose-tone

Click here to learn more or to order

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One of my own bags of the awesome Espoma Organic Rose-tone. This is the best rose food I've ever used. Period.
Roses
09-27-23
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09-24-23.
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This image, and the next 4, are dated 09-21-23.
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September 20, 2023.
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Some of my roses, blooming in the rain, on September 19, 2023.
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All of my rose bushes (except my two floribundas) are budding and blooming well into September. Here are a few of them on September 17, 2023.
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09-13-23.
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This image, and the next one, are dated 09-12-23.
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This image, and the next 6, are dated from 09-07-23 to 09-10-23.
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09-06-23
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Floribunda 'Ebb Tide' on 08-26-23.
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August 25, 2023.
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August 24, 2023.
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This image, and the following 13, are from the summer of 2023.
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This image, and the next, are from the third week in June of 2023.
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This image, and the next 40, are dated from 06-01-23 through 06-10-23.
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This photo, and the next, were taken on 05-31-23.
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This photo, and the next five, were taken from 05-22-23 - 05-30-23.
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My roses are setting buds and looking green and glossy on 05-10-23.
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Well, well, well... My newest rose, the vaunted 'Blue Girl' hybrid tea, which was planted as a bare root specimen in early April, has beaten all of my established rose bushes to the punch and is the very first one to bud. 05-07-23. Pretty cool, I think.
Roses
My roses on 4-15-23. The Blue Girl hybrid tea rose is in the next shot. Also taken on 04-15-23. Everything is growing beautifully. I'll wait until the blooms come before I put more rose pics up.
Roses
This photo (of the Blue Girl hybrid tea rose), and the next two, were taken 04-12-23. The Blue Girl continues to send up healthy growth and is thorning up and leafing out. All of the other roses in my rose garden planting feature are doing the same after a hard prune and a heavy feeding on 04-02-23. Things don't look too rosy, now, but I promise that everything will be coming up roses here before too much longer. Check back and tell me what you think.
The Blue Girl hybrid tea went into the ground on 4-2-23. Had to cut it out of the bucket (which was prepped by yours truly with drainage holes). Dug a big, deep hole and prepped it with systemic chipmunk/vole repellent, and and dropped the pH very slightly to around 6.4-6.5 with some acidifier. Sunk that Blue Girl for a birdie.
Roses
The Blue Girl is safely in the ground. I like to plant my roses slightly deep, keeping all vital structures covered by approximately 3-4 inches of soil, plus another 1-2 inches of mulch. Implementing this level of insulation and protection ensures the survival of each bush over the frigid winters here in zone 5B/6A (I never cover my roses in the winter). If I see that the nodes on the canes are struggling to send up growth, I'll clear some dirt/mulch out of the way. This generally is not necessary. No fertilizer yet besides the minimal amount of slow-release stuff in the potting soil I use for all of my plant bedding activities.
Roses
Roses are all hard pruned and fertilized (except for the Blue Girl). New growth is emerging from nodes above and below ground level. Right now, the Rose Garden planting feature looks pretty desolate, but these guys are gonna do great this year.
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'Blue Girl' starting to leaf out at the nodes, and getting ready for planting on March 30, 2023.
This little guy will get planted within the next month or two.
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Late summer color from some of my roses in 2022.
I just bought this little cutie today (March 19, 2023): a tiny yellow miniature rose, from a big box store, no less. I have no idea of its name or variety, and I don't care in the least. The very first plant in my garden was also a mini rose, and it came from the same big box store a few years back. It thrives to this day, and grows bigger every year (you can read about it by scrolling down on this page). I have high hopes for this brand new, little yellow rose.
Roses
Pictured is the tiny decorative pot that this little rose, until today, called home. Due to the fact that this plant is so incredibly tiny, and its rootball is so immature and undeveloped, I'll keep it indoors, in this much larger blue pot (I just transferred it) until it grows a bit more, and the weather improves. It will probably go into my rose garden's ground in early May.
Roses
Rosa 'Kölner Karneval,' aka 'Blue Girl.' You'll read more about this exhibition hybrid tea rose if you scroll down just a bit. It'll be joining the rest of my roses in the rose garden planting feature imminently. Nodes are popping up all over its canes.
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Rosa 'WEKtebodoko.' 'Whimsy.' Believe it or not, this amazing bush is a miniature!
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Rosa 'WEKsmopur.' The 'Ebb Tide' floribunda.
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My sprawiling Knock Out rose bush.
The 'Livin' Easy' floribunda rose. Rosa 'HARwelcome.'
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This awesome bush is another mini. The bush itself grows tall and wide, and the flowers open to nearly 4" in diameter. This is the very first plant that I bought for my garden. It came from a big box store, and had no name. I adore it.
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'Ruby Ruby.' Rosa 'WEKsactrumi.'
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My 'Blue Girl' hybrid tea rose arrived on March 6, 2023, in bare root form. Rosa 'Kölner Karneval.' This exhibition tea will grow to over 3' in height and spread, and will boast massive 5"-6" silvery/lavender/blue, fully double blooms. It's going in the ground in the rose garden planting feature very soon, where it'll get wild and mean like the rest of my roses. It'll fit right in.
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'Blue Girl' waits in a 5-gallon bucket for a break in the weather. While it does, it passes the time by sprouting new nodes up and down its main canes. I think this one'll be a real beauty. Stay tuned. I'll add progress pics to this gallery throughout the spring and summer.
Roses
A close-up of a bare root/own root rose bush. This particular bush is an English shrub rose from David Austin Roses called 'Tranquillity'. In the case of an own root rose, the plant's canes arise directly from its own root crown and root stock. This differs from the case of a grafted plant, the canes of which are grafted onto the root stock of a different plant.
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David Austin Roses does an excellent job of packing and sending bare root roses to customers. Although the plants arrive in moist, healthy condition, loosely wrapped in plastic and a moist soil composite, it's imperative to soak these and all bare root roses in water (I soak mine for 12 hours) to just above the level of the crown before bedding them.
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Crappy weather prevented immediate planting, so I potted this bare root bush in soil, making sure to spray the canes with water in order to remove any dirt and to help keep the plant hydrated.

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